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Law Society responds to Scottish Legal Complaints Commission annual report

18 December 2013 | tagged News release

Responding to the publication today of the Scottish Legal Complaints Commission annual report for 2012/13, which shows a reduction in the number of complaints received, Carole Ford, the non-solicitor Convener of the Law Society of Scotland's Regulatory Committee, said: "It is encouraging to see a further fall in the overall numbers of complaints. It is also positive that so many are being resolved directly between solicitors and clients without intervention from the Society or the Commission.

"With over 10,000 solicitors and millions of legal transactions each year, the relatively low number of complaints underlines the high standard of customer service which the profession are providing to their clients - research commissioned by the SLCC in 2012 has shown that less than 0.3% of all transactions result in a complaint. It will still be important to learn from the Commission's analysis of trends in complaints so we offer further guidance and training to help solicitors improve further.

"It is essential that we have an effective and efficient system in place for the relatively small number of occasions when things do go wrong and complaint is made. The system of co-regulation with the SLCC, Law Society and independent discipline tribunal is still bedding in from the 2007 and 2010 reforms. The system is not perfect but we have a clear picture of how things can be improved. It is encouraging to see that our joint efforts are having an impact and we will continue to work together, and with government, to drive forward improvements for the benefit of the public and the profession."

Notes to editors

The Scottish Legal Complaints Commission received 1,123 new complaints in 2012/13, down from 1,264 in 2011/12.  The full report and research can be found at: www.scottishlegalcomplaints.com.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please contact Val McEwan on 0131 226 8884. Email: valeriemcewan@lawscot.org.uk

18 December 2013

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