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Law Society launches conference on Scotland's constitutional future

26 February 2014 | tagged News release

With less than seven months to go until the historic independence referendum, the debate on Scotland's future is reaching a critical point.

To capture this key moment, the Law Society of Scotland will host a conference on Scotland's constitutional future on 10 April 2014, which will focus on the big issues at stake in the independence vote and ensure the voices of Scotland's 10,000 solicitors are heard.

The event will feature key note contributions from Deputy First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon and Secretary of State for Scotland, Alistair Carmichael, who will set out their arguments on whether Scotland should be an independent country or remain part of the UK.  Professor John Curtice will also offer expert analysis on the state of the race and what the polls tell us about the views of those who will decide Scotland's future.

The conference will also explore key topics, such as currency and economics, Scotland's membership of international organisations, political and parliamentary reform and consider what change could mean for the legal profession itself.

Bruce Beveridge, President of the Law Society of Scotland, said: "We hope that members will be able to join us for our lively one day conference as the Law Society focuses on the big issues at stake in the independence vote.

"It is an event not to be missed and one which is sure to generate new questions as well as challenge the issues raised so far."

ENDS                                                                                                  26 FEBRUARY 2014

Notes to editors

The conference will take place at Dynamic Earth, Edinburgh on the 10 April 2014.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Journalists can contact Julia Brown on 0131 476 8204 or Kevin Lang on 0131 476 8167. For the out of hours service please call 0131 226 7411.

Email: juliabrown@lawscot.org.uk/ kevinlang@lawscot.org.uk

26 February 2014

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