The Lawscot ID card gives you access to prisons, courts, and police stations and identifies you as a Scottish qualified solicitor. We have put together a few FAQs about the new ID card. If you have any further questions, please contact smartcard@lawscot.org.uk.

There are slight changes in the design of the ID-only card. We removed the logos of the signature supplier and the CCBE, since these two organisations are not involved with an ID issued by the Society. Other than that, the ID-only card contains the same information as the Smartcard with QES – your solicitor ID number, a photograph of you, and the name you practice under.

Yes, we have been in contact with the courts, prison service, and police service throughout. All agencies are aware of the ID-only card and of the design changes. Both ID-only cards and Smartcards with QES still contain the solicitor ID number which can be checked online. If in doubt, any agency can make use of that facility.

We issue Law Society ID cards only to solicitors holding a current practising certificate.

You do not need to sign a contract for your Lawscot ID card. We will check your submission, produce a card for you, and send it to your registered business address. You do have the same obligation as with every other ID, though – in case of loss or theft, please inform us by emailing smartcard@lawscot.org.uk, so we can arrange a replacement.

The only additional information will be a photograph. All other data will be the same as already held on our main regulatory system, fulfilling the statutory functions around the registration of solicitors.

The Lawscot ID card is available only to licensed solicitors with a valid PC. Therefore, the ID-only card immediately identifies you as such to prospective clients, potential employers, or security personnel in courts and prisons.

No, you still have to go through the online process of renewing your practising certificate every year. Your ID-only card provides evidence of your entitlement to practice, though. Since only licensed solicitors with a valid PC can obtain this card, it immediately identifies you as such to prospective clients, potential employers, or security personnel in courts and prisons.

Your Lawscot ID card is valid for 10 years. When requesting a replacement for an ID-only card that is nearing its end of validity period, please go through the submission process again. This is due to the fact that we cannot reuse your photograph as it will be already 10 years old at that point – we cannot produce a new card with an old photo. As before, we will check your submission, produce a card for you, and send it to the business address we have for you.

Please inform us of any loss or damage to your ID-only card as soon as possible. You can do so by emailing smartcard@lawscot.org.uk. We will then produce a new card and send it to your registered business address.

If you stop practising law, you need to return your Lawscot ID card to us. Without a PC, you are not entitled to this kind of identification. In addition, the Scottish Solicitor Status Check will show you as “not entitled to practise.” This online tool can be used by everyone to interrogate the solicitor ID number on your card.

No. The ID-only card is tied to you and your status as practising solicitor, not the firm you work for. However, when submitting for one, you are asked to provide an email address. Please ensure that this is an address you have access to for several years, as we will be using it to communicate with you regarding your ID card.

Yes, the name you practise under should also be the name printed on your Law Society ID card. Once you have alerted the Registrar to the name change, please contact us at smartcard@lawscot.org.uk . A new card with the correct name will then be produced and sent to your business address.

Yes, of course you can. As long as you have a Scottish practising certificate, you will be able to receive your ID card.

Scottish solicitor status check

Check if an individual holding a Smartcard or a Lawscot ID card is currently entitled to practise as a solicitor in Scotland.